Monday, 8 July 2013

Violin Diary-Introduction

Badiarov violins

Those who have visited my blog before, or are visiting for the first time, may notice that my site header is a photo of a number of violins in a row, including a whitish one, which is the first violin that I have made, before it was varnished. I have spent the most part of the last year making this violin. I am currently in the process of varnishing it, which is a slow process of applying one coat and then allowing it to dry before applying another. This is the current state of my first violin.



While waiting for the varnish to dry, I have begun making my second violin. I have decided to catalogue my experiences on my blog in a violin diary of sorts. I hope you follow and enjoy the journey.

There is a small cast of characters that I should probably introduce before steaming ahead:
-Dmitry Badiarov is an accomplished musician and master violin maker. I have been studying the art of violin making under his guidance at his wonderful Badiarov Violins Gallery (http://badiarovviolins.com). In the short video below you can see Dmitry playing on a Violoncello da spalla:

-Jiji is Dmitry's newly acquired kitten:

Violin making requires patience, artistry, attention to detail and tool handling skills, none of which I inherently possess. So violin making is a great challenge for me. Through this violin diary, I will share some of the joys and many frustrations of this lengthy, but fulfilling journey.

Some short facts about the violin:

  • A violin consists of approximately 70 different parts, most of which are handmade from pieces of wood.
  • A professional grade, handmade violin takes approximately 200 hours to complete.
  • The violin is the sturdiest, most structurally sound instrument ever invented and a well cared for violin can last up to 400 years.
In short the violin is an incredible instrument. I like the idea that something that I spend 200 hours making, will outlive me and give great joy to many future generations. So I begin the long journey of making a violin with a mix of excitement and anticipation, but also a healthy dose of fear and trepidation.
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